Irish Gov't: Listen to Irish Medical Professionals and Reject 'Assisted Dying' Bill Now!

Petition: Don't Legalise Euthanasia

 

Irish Gov't: Listen to Irish Medical Professionals and Reject 'Assisted Dying' Bill Now!

Irish Gov't: Listen to Irish Medical Professionals and Reject 'Assisted Dying' Bill Now!

05,000
  2,371
 
2,371 have signed. Let's get to 5,000!

Irish mental health professionals have spoken and they do not want the Government to legalise euthanasia, assisted suicide, or "assisted dying". [* See definitions below.]

Please SIGN and SHARE this urgent petition saying NO to any efforts to legalise euthanasia, assisted suicide, or "assisted dying" in Ireland.

This petition will  go to the leaders of Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, encouraging the Government to increase palliative care resources for treating the physically unwell and to increase mental health resources for those suffering with mental health issues.

The upshot of the expert medical testimony by Ireland's mental health experts was firm opposition to the introduction of euthanasia in Ireland while, at the same time, strenuous calls for increased provision for enhanced treatment options.

Therefore, this petition will also be delivered to members of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Assisted Dying which is due to make recommendations to the Dáil in the new year. Our hope is that their recommendations will accurately reflect the testimony given to them by Ireland's leading healthcare experts.

Here are some representative snippets of expert testimony given by Irish medical professionals who flatly rejected euthanasia, assisted suicide and assisted dying:

  • Professor Siobhan MacHale, consultant liaison psychiatrist at Beaumont Hospital and College of Psychiatrists member, said of current deficiencies in the system: "The answer to this is not to end our patients’ lives," but, rather, to determine how we can improve the situation with "evidence-based interventions".
  • Dr. Anne Doherty, also of the College of Psychiatrists and also a consultant liaison psychiatrist, called for "full access to adequate palliative care and mental healthcare," and concluded her statement by saying that: "It would be a travesty if assisted dying became a substitute for assistance in living."
  • Dr Eric Kelleher, consultant liaison psychiatrist and a member of the College’s Human Rights and Ethics Committee, said that euthanasia and "assisted dying" formed a slippery slope, saying that if it was legalised in Ireland, it would become impossible to "limit it to just one group"; that is, it would be impossible to limit it to those suffering "terminal illness", as the definition of what that means could be changed very quickly. Also, he advised against "normalising" euthanasia and "assisted dying" as it could "expose more people to vulnerability." 
  • Professor Ella Arensman, chief scientist at the National Suicide Research Foundation, said that Ireland should look closely at what has happened in other countries since they legalised euthanasia: “When we look at the evolution of the development of countries like Netherlands and Belgium, it appeared too frequently that rigorous mental health assessments were not followed through intensively with disastrous or close to disastrous outcomes."

Please SIGN and SHARE this petition and tell the leaders of FF and FG (as well as the Joint Committee on Assisted Dying) to listen to the Irish mental health professionals.

Tell them to reject euthanasia, assisted suicide and assisted dying, and, rather, to increase provision for those suffering physical and mental pain.

While this Oireachtas special committee will hear testimony in the next few days, it's not clear how much more public work they will do before drafting their reports for the Dáil and Seanad which they must deliver by March.

That's why we must act now!

In addition to the excellent testimony given by Irish mental health care professionals, there are many other good reasons for Ireland to reject assisted dying and euthanasia:

1. 'Compassion' doesn't involve killing the weakest, most vulnerable members of society. That is neither ethical nor moral.
2. The Irish Constitution mandates the state to protect human life. Already that has been tragically altered to allow abortion. We can't let this anti-life policy extend to other areas of human life that warrants our protection.
3. The Irish Association for Palliative Care stands firm: euthanasia and assisted suicide don't gel with palliative care.
4. Modern palliative care can handle even the most intense pain.
5. Just like with abortion, conscientious objection to euthanasia and assisted dying is not guaranteed to last.
6. Legal abuse of euthanasia and assisted dying is real, even acknowledged by its supporters.

But, this isn't just about policy; it's about protecting our most vulnerable and upholding the values we cherish. Imagine a world where life's value is so easily disregarded – do we really want to take that step? Let's not take this dangerous path.

Thank you for SIGNING and SHARING this petition now.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

‘No person is an island’ – Irish psychiatrists oppose introduction of assisted dying laws - https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/no-person-is-an-island-irish-psychiatrists-oppose-introduction-of-assisted-dying-laws/a759223412.html

'Substandard end-of-life care' means assisted dying proposals are 'concerning' - https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/arid-41269327.html

Deaths by assisted dying 'more likely to be older women', committee hears - https://www.rte.ie/news/politics/2023/1114/1416440-assissted-dying-committee/

Euthanasia is rejection of a fundamentally important ethical norm against intentional killing - https://gript.ie/euthanasia-is-rejection-of-a-fundamentally-important-ethical-norm-against-intentional-killing/

**Euthanasia allows an individual to gain a lethal prescription from a doctor and kill themselves. Assisted suicide, on the other hand, permits a doctor to intentionally cause the death of another person. It is done by doctors who administer a lethal drug cocktail to knowingly cause the death of another person.And, assisted dying is a slight tweak on assisted suicide, theoretically allowing only those diagnosed with a terminal illness to be killed.

05,000
  2,371
 
2,371 have signed. Let's get to 5,000!

Complete your signature

Sign this petition now!

 
Please enter your email
Please enter your first name
Please enter your last name
Please enter your country
Please enter your zip code
Please select an option:
We process your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service

Stand with Medical Professionals: Help the suffering, don't kill by euthanasia

We, the undersigned, stand with the mental healthcare professionals of Ireland and emphatically reject the legalisation of euthanasia and so-called "assisted dying" in Ireland.

Over the past month, representatives of different psychological and psychiatric bodies, including the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland and the National Suicide Research Foundation, gave testimony to the Joint Committee on Assisted Dying.

While each testimonial highlighted the need for improvement of provision of mental health service, they also each clearly stated their opposition to the introduction of euthanasia and "assisted dying" in Ireland.

In case you missed their testimony, here are some of the highlights:

**Professor Siobhan MacHale, consultant liaison psychiatrist at Beaumont Hospital, said: "The answer to this is not to end our patients’ lives," but, rather, to determine how we can improve the situation with "evidence-based interventions".

**Dr. Anne Doherty, also of the College of Psychiatrists and also a consultant liaison psychiatrist, called for "full access to adequate palliative care and mental healthcare," and concluded her statement by saying that: "It would be a travesty if assisted dying became a substitute for assistance in living."

**Dr Eric Kelleher, consultant liaison psychiatrist and a member of the College’s Human Rights and Ethics Committee, said that euthanasia and "assisted dying" formed a slippery slope, saying that if it was legalised in Ireland, it would become impossible to "limit it to just one group.

Also, he advised against "normalising" euthanasia and "assisted dying" as it could "expose more people to vulnerability."

**And, Professor Ella Arensman, chief scientist at the NSRF***, said that Ireland should look closely at what has happened in other countries since they legalised euthanasia: “When we look at the evolution of the development of countries like Netherlands and Belgium, it appeared too frequently that rigorous mental health assessments were not followed through intensively with disastrous or close to disastrous outcomes."

We, the undersigned, agree with the mental health professionals of Ireland: More provision for mental health is required, not provision for killing the unwell and the vulnerable.

On the basis of this testimony, we call on the Joint Committee, as well as on the leaders of Ireland's governing parties, to reject this dangerous bill.

Instead, please introduce new legislation which would give Irish healthcare professionals the resources - whether it be palliative care for those suffering physical pain, or whether it be psychiatric care for those suffering mentally - they need to assist the vulnerable in their treatment.

We will be monitoring this situation to see what you do, and we will also be discussing this important issue with our like-minded family, friends, colleagues and fellow church-goers.

Thank you for acting now to ensure that the vulnerable are protected, not killed.

[Your Name]

Stand with Medical Professionals: Help the suffering, don't kill by euthanasia

We, the undersigned, stand with the mental healthcare professionals of Ireland and emphatically reject the legalisation of euthanasia and so-called "assisted dying" in Ireland.

Over the past month, representatives of different psychological and psychiatric bodies, including the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland and the National Suicide Research Foundation, gave testimony to the Joint Committee on Assisted Dying.

While each testimonial highlighted the need for improvement of provision of mental health service, they also each clearly stated their opposition to the introduction of euthanasia and "assisted dying" in Ireland.

In case you missed their testimony, here are some of the highlights:

**Professor Siobhan MacHale, consultant liaison psychiatrist at Beaumont Hospital, said: "The answer to this is not to end our patients’ lives," but, rather, to determine how we can improve the situation with "evidence-based interventions".

**Dr. Anne Doherty, also of the College of Psychiatrists and also a consultant liaison psychiatrist, called for "full access to adequate palliative care and mental healthcare," and concluded her statement by saying that: "It would be a travesty if assisted dying became a substitute for assistance in living."

**Dr Eric Kelleher, consultant liaison psychiatrist and a member of the College’s Human Rights and Ethics Committee, said that euthanasia and "assisted dying" formed a slippery slope, saying that if it was legalised in Ireland, it would become impossible to "limit it to just one group.

Also, he advised against "normalising" euthanasia and "assisted dying" as it could "expose more people to vulnerability."

**And, Professor Ella Arensman, chief scientist at the NSRF***, said that Ireland should look closely at what has happened in other countries since they legalised euthanasia: “When we look at the evolution of the development of countries like Netherlands and Belgium, it appeared too frequently that rigorous mental health assessments were not followed through intensively with disastrous or close to disastrous outcomes."

We, the undersigned, agree with the mental health professionals of Ireland: More provision for mental health is required, not provision for killing the unwell and the vulnerable.

On the basis of this testimony, we call on the Joint Committee, as well as on the leaders of Ireland's governing parties, to reject this dangerous bill.

Instead, please introduce new legislation which would give Irish healthcare professionals the resources - whether it be palliative care for those suffering physical pain, or whether it be psychiatric care for those suffering mentally - they need to assist the vulnerable in their treatment.

We will be monitoring this situation to see what you do, and we will also be discussing this important issue with our like-minded family, friends, colleagues and fellow church-goers.

Thank you for acting now to ensure that the vulnerable are protected, not killed.

[Your Name]